Traduci

Current events in Naples

cms_7677/1.jpg

(@mined_oud) – which may or may not be the artist’s email address backwards, creates an absurd type of synaesthesia between an oriental plant (oud or agarwood), the allusion to exhausted mine seams and the apparent creation of a potential palindrome – is the title of the first solo show to be held in an Italian public institution by the artist Darren Bader (Bridgeport, CT 1978), one of the most experimental international artists of recent generations.

cms_7677/2.jpg

At the Madre museum the artist plays with the traditional format of a solo show and turns it into multi-faceted analytical tool of models by which works of art are viewed and mediated within an institutional space-time framework. Bader’s works and graphic interventions are displayed within the itinerary of the collection, constituting a veritable – albeit almost imperceptible – “exhibition within the exhibition“, formed by a series of concealed clues which, in its overall layout, expresses an elliptical perspective, full of ironic short circuits and linguistic games, the themes addressed, the communicative and educational logic underpinning the displays, the theoretical foundations of the collection and the identity of the contemporary art museum.

cms_7677/3.jpg

The intricate, nuanced work of the artist is designed as a subtle game for the visitor. It also includes an invitation to exhibit addressed to a series of other artists, whose works will be presented, together with Bader’s own and others that are part of the collection. A group of other works, which are frequently minimalist, of a transformative or performative nature, or targeted at a digital audience, will be as well presented.

cms_7677/4.jpg

Right from the very title of the work, with the apposition of the “@” symbol and the use of parentheses, Bader establishes a purely digital level of meaning and experience of the exhibition which, at a physical level, is scattered and integrated within the itinerary of the museum collection, thus rejecting a rigid focal point and avoiding immediate recognisability, in an attempt to establish a connection with the identities, practices and works of the artists in the collection. By exploring the mechanisms underpinning the workings of the contemporary collective imagination, from which colliding aesthetics surface, and by intervening in areas of the museum that are not directly connected with each other (Project room, ground floor; courtyard; second floor), Bader questions the very nature of “art”, “artworks”, “exhibitions” and the “museum”, challenging the values, criteria, mechanisms of thought and communicative logic of the contemporary art system.

cms_7677/5.jpg

Bader defines himself a “sculptor”; his practice consists in putting together complementary elements such as consumer goods, words, images, animals and people. These disparate elements of reality generate relationships that are simultaneously concrete and imaginary, real yet fictional.

cms_7677/6.jpg

As Luca Lo Pinto explains in the artist book that accompanies the exhibition, “[Bader] plans speed dates that sometimes turn into marriages. He causes love to bloom between two people who are unaware of being lovers. Rather than creating, he edits. Rather than producing, he selects. Rather than representing, he shows“. Bader removes meaning yet adds new levels of understanding and introspection to works, objects and (possible, or often impossible) descriptions and manages to lend an original twist to a practice whose meaning can be sought in the carefully arranged inclusion of all the components of the art system: the work, the artist, the gallery owner, the collector, the exhibition visitor and readers of art texts. In this sense, Bader’s work can be analysed in terms of “information technology” (as Andrea Norman Wilson writes in the new artist book): it separates and rejoins the inner system of the work (its aesthetic component) and the external structure, or “back end”, which runs and conditions it (the art system itself).

cms_7677/7.jpg

In the fairly recent past, the “back end” of the artist’s work consisted, for example, in the artist’s capacity to grind the right powdered pigment to create the most suitable colour for capturing reality in a painting. However, over the last forty years, the “back end” has been transformed into the capacity of the art system to turn anything into an art work.

cms_7677/9.jpg

Exploring a discourse which began with Marcel Duchamp’s seminal ready-mades and continued subsequently, during the sixties and seventies, with the criticisms of art system put forward by the Institutional Critique, Bader argues that the aspects of artistic production underlying those assumptions are now so obvious, thoroughly explored and artistically expressed, even in terms of deconstruction and direct repudiation, that the next step is no longer a question of criticising or keeping in check the art system, but instead acceptance, knowing incorporation and a shared narrative. Bader thus demonstrates that the joint participation of all the different players involved in the system cannot fail to generate, together with the additional inclusion of factors and ideas borrowed from the omnipresent media, an added value of art in the current era of the sharing economy.

cms_7677/8.jpg

Bader’s practice is based on the inclusion and sharing of the work, which often becomes a multi-author creation or a form of “collective intelligence”. For this reason, as well as the presentation of his own work, Bader’s intervention at the Madre comprises linguistic interventions on several wall captions of works in the collection, whose contents are reinvented by the artist, and the invitation to form part of the exhibition design aimed at a series of other artists, whose works will be presented in the collection, forming a veritable “collection within the collection“: Lucas Ajemian, Kai Althoff, Francesco Arena, John Armleder, Darren Bader, Eli Begen, Nina Beier, Monica Bonvicini, Gregorio Botta, Paolo Bresciani, Sol Calero, Antoine Catala, Maurizio Cattelan, Matthew Cerletty, Maria Adele Del Vecchio, Eugenio della Croce, Amelia Diacono, J.W. Dibbi, Alberto Di Fabio, Gerardo Di Fiore, Roe Ethridge, Pierpaolo Falone, Sergio Fermariello, Ilaria Fincantieri, Urs Fischer, Anselm Fuchs, Ganzbrot Kollektiv, Jef Geys, Eugenio Giliberti, Judith Goudsmit, Leila Heidari, Corin Hewitt, KAYA (Kerstin Brätsch-Debo Eilers-Kaya Serene), Barbara Kasten, Marc Kokopeli, Runo Lagomarsino, Greta Lauber, Mark Leckey, Sherrie Levine, Pietro Lista, Emilio Mazzerano, John McCracken, Alessandro Mendini, Aurelie Messerin, Jonathan Monk, Alvise Monserrato, Anca Munteanu Rimnic, Marcella Musacchi, Katharina Sieverding, Michael E Smith, Heji Shin, Martine Syms, Rosemarie Trockel, Elio Washimps, John Wesley, Christopher Williams, Micheal Zahn.

cms_7677/italfahne.jpgMostre in corso a Napoli

(@mined_oud): l’ultimo progetto espositivo di Darren Bader al Museo Madre

(@mined_oud) – gioco di parole che potrebbe o non potrebbe derivare dalla lettura in senso contrario dell’indirizzo email dell’artista e che propone un’assurda sinestesia fra il nome di un’essenza orientale, l’allusione all’esaurimento di un filone minerario e l’apparente generazione di un potenziale palindromo – è il titolo della prima mostra personale in un’istituzione pubblica italiana di Darren Bader (Bridgeport, CT, 1978), uno dei più sperimentali artisti internazionali delle ultime generazioni.

Al Madre l’artista trasforma il tradizionale dispositivo della mostra personale in uno strumento plurimo e molteplice di analisi dei modelli con cui le opere d’arte sono recepite e mediate nello spazio-tempo istituzionale. Le opere e gli interventi grafici di Bader sono inseriti nel percorso della collezione costituendo una vera e propria, anche se volutamente quasi non percepibile, “mostra nella mostra” formata da una serie di esche disseminate in un allestimento a “camouflage” che, nella sua articolazione complessiva, esprime un punto di vista ellittico, denso di cortocircuiti ironici e giochi linguistici sulle singole opere, sui temi affrontati, sulle logiche d’allestimento, comunicative e didattiche, sugli statuti stessi della collezione e dell’identità museale contemporanea. L’intervento sfumato, intricato dell’artista, è concepito come un gioco sottile per il visitatore, che include anche un invito ad esporre indirizzato a una serie di altri artisti, le cui opere saranno presentate, insieme a quelle di Bader e a quelle entrate in collezione. Sarà presentato anche un gruppo di altri lavori, spesso minimi, di natura trasformativa o performativa, o destinati al pubblico digitale.

Fin dal titolo, con l’apposizione del simbolo “@” e delle parentesi, l’artista stabilisce un primo piano puramente digitale di senso e di esperienza della mostra che, fisicamente, si disperde e si integra con il percorso di visita della collezione del museo, rifiutando quindi un baricentro rigido e privandosi di un’immediata riconoscibilità, per porsi invece in relazione con le identità, le pratiche, le opere degli artisti in collezione. Esplorando i meccanismi di funzionamento dell’immaginario contemporaneo, di cui fa affiorare le estetiche collidenti, ed intervenendo in aree del museo fra loro non direttamente collegate (Project room, piano terra; cortile; secondo piano) Bader rimette in discussione la concezione di cosa si considera “arte”, “opera”, “mostra”, “museo”, proponendo una serie di domande sui valori, sui criteri, sui meccanismi di pensiero e sulle logiche comunicative proprie del sistema dell’arte contemporanea.

Bader si definisce uno “scultore”: la sua pratica consiste nel mettere insieme elementi complementari quali oggetti di consumo, parole, immagini, animali, persone. Elementi disparati di realtà che generano relazioni al contempo concrete e immaginarie, reali e fictional.

Come scrive Luca Lo Pinto nel libro d’artista che accompagna questa mostra, Bader “pianifica degli speed dates che talvolta si trasformano in matrimoni. Fa sbocciare l’amore tra due innamorati che non sanno di esserlo. Non crea, edita. Non produce, seleziona. Non rappresenta, mostra“. Bader priva di senso e al contempo aggiunge nuovi livelli di comprensione ed introspezione ad opere, oggetti e descrizioni possibili, o spesso impossibili, e riesce a rendere singolare una pratica il cui significato va ricercato nella calibrata inclusione di tutti i componenti del sistema dell’arte: opera, artista, gallerista, collezionista, visitatore di mostre, lettore di cataloghi. In questo senso la pratica di Bader può essere analizzata in termini “informatici” (come scrive, nel nuovo libro d’artista, Andrea Norman Wilson): essa scinde e riaccoppia il sistema interno dell’opera (la sua componente estetica) e la struttura esterna, o “back end”, che la gestisce e condiziona (il sistema dell’arte stesso). Se in un passato non troppo lontano il “back end” del lavoro di un artista era costituito, per esempio, dalla capacità dell’artista stesso di pestare il giusto pigmento di polvere per creare il colore più adatto alla restituzione del reale in un dipinto, negli ultimi quarant’anni quel “back end” si è trasformato nella capacità del sistema dell’arte di far divenire qualsiasi cosa un’opera d’arte. Attraversando un discorso iniziato dai seminali ready-made di Marcel Duchamp e poi, fra gli anni Sessanta e Settanta, dalle critiche al sistema dell’arte proprie dell’institutional critique, Bader dichiara che gli aspetti della produzione artistica alla base di quegli assunti sono ormai così palesi, indagati ed artisticamente espressi, anche in termini di decostruzione o denuncia frontale, che il passo successivo è non più la critica o la messa in scacco del sistema dell’arte, ma la sua positiva accettazione, consapevole incorporazione, narrazione condivisa. Bader dimostra così che la compartecipazione di tutta la serie degli attori che compongono questo sistema non può che generare, insieme a un’ulteriore inclusione di fattori e spunti mutuati da media onnipresenti, un valore accrescitivo dell’arte, al tempo della sharing economy.

La pratica di Bader è basata sull’inclusione e la condivisione dell’opera, che diviene spesso una creazione multi-autoriale o una forma di “intelligenza collettiva”. Per questo, accanto alla presentazione di proprie opere, l’intervento di Bader al Madre include interventi linguistici su alcune didascalie a muro di opere in collezione, i cui contenuti sono reinventati dall’artista, e l’invito a far parte del suo progetto espositivo rivolto a una serie di altri artisti, le cui opere saranno presentate nel percorso della collezione costituendovi una vera e propria “collezione nella collezione”: Lucas Ajemian, Kai Althoff, Francesco Arena, John Armleder, Darren Bader, Eli Begen, Nina Beier, Monica Bonvicini, Gregorio Botta, Paolo Bresciani, Sol Calero, Antoine Catala, Maurizio Cattelan, Matthew Cerletty, Maria Adele Del Vecchio, Eugenio della Croce, Amelia Diacono, J.W. Dibbi, Alberto Di Fabio, Gerardo Di Fiore, Roe Ethridge, Pierpaolo Falone, Sergio Fermariello, Ilaria Fincantieri, Urs Fischer, Anselm Fuchs, Ganzbrot Kollektiv, Jef Geys, Eugenio Giliberti, Judith Goudsmit, Leila Heidari, Corin Hewitt, KAYA (Kerstin Brätsch-Debo Eilers-Kaya Serene), Barbara Kasten, Marc Kokopeli, Runo Lagomarsino, Greta Lauber, Mark Leckey, Sherrie Levine, Pietro Lista, Emilio Mazzerano, John McCracken, Alessandro Mendini, Aurelie Messerin, Jonathan Monk, Alvise Monserrato, Anca Munteanu Rimnic, Marcella Musacchi, Katharina Sieverding, Michael E Smith, Heji Shin, Martine Syms, Rosemarie Trockel, Elio Washimps, John Wesley, Christopher Williams, Micheal Zahn.

Data:

10 Novembre 2017